Open Access, Predatory Publishing & Constellation

Slides from the March 15, 2017 Engaging Our Digital Natives seminar.

Additional information is posted here: researchguides.ben.edu/digital-natives

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Seminar: Open-Access Publishing @ Benedictine University

Open Access, Predatory Publishing & Constellation

Wednesday, March 15 – 12:00 – 12:45 PM

Library Conference Room – KN 311

Open access journals and institutional repositories benefit the scholarly community, but open access has also opened the door to predatory publishing. Often, predatory journals use convincing titles and list prominent academics on their editorial boards without permission, making it difficult to distinguish them from legitimate journals.

Among the questions addressed by our archivist Katy Scullin and emerging technologies librarian Sarah Kurpiel will be:

  • What is the difference between green and gold open access?
  • What are the benefits?
  • What are the myths?
  • How can I tell if an open access journal is legitimate or predatory?
  • If I publish in a traditional journal, how can I retain some rights to my work?
  • How do I deposit my work in Constellation?
  • What ethical concerns surround for-profit repositories and Sci-Hub?

There will be time at the end of the presentation for discussion.  In addition, Sarah and Katy will be available to help  you to set up a Constellation account.

Questions?  Please contact jhopkins@ben.edu (x6052)

Phony vs Legit

“How Do You Know A Journal or Publisher Is Legitimate?” by Dana Haugh, Stony Hook University LIbraries

Information Literacy Learning Activities: Race & Social Justice

The Benedictine librarians, in collaboration with faculty, have created some learning activities to help develop the Information Literacy skills of our students.  Here are some resources you may wish to use to support some of the research assignments related to next week’s Teach-In activitiesYou’ll also find them posted in the Race and Social Justice Research Guide:

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is an activity we introduced at one of our Engaging Our Digital Natives workshops last year.  Since then, we’ve been told that many faculty have used this resource with great success.

–  Use the slides to discuss how information is delivered in various formats.   How do you determine which formats are the most reliable?  Which formats are appropriate for academic research?  What is the difference between scholarly and academic resources?   Which are primary and which are secondary resources?

If you have room to move around your classroom space, give each student a different format (tweet, library book, article, etc.) and have them work together to determine the sequence in which these different forms of information were created.
Link to additional discussion questions.

o   access subject specific academic databases
o   export citations to the new version of RefWorks
o   use GoogleScholar to create a “citation chain”
May these prove to be helpful resources for you!