Tips and Strategies for Evaluating Fake News

Are you looking for some new information literacy assignment and activity ideas for the new semester?    Project CORA is an excellent open-access resource for Information Literacy lesson plans, handouts and activities.

Of timely interest might be Keepin’ It Real: Tips and Strategies for Evaluating Fake News.  It contains materials used at a Loyola Marymount  University workshop designed to help  students became more confident in their ability to use critical thinking skills to judge the reliability of news reports, whether they come via print, television or the internet.

We’ve placed a link to these materials on the Additional Resources page of our Library’s Fake News Research Guide.

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The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy Toolkit

The new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy Toolkit is intended as a freely available professional development resource that can be used and adapted by both individuals and groups in order to foster understanding and use of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.

The ACRL Framework Toolkit contains four modules:

  1. Finding Time to Engage the Framework,
  2. The Framework’s Structure,
  3. Foundations of the Framework, and
  4. Strategies for Using the Framework.

A fifth module, Collaboration and Conversations with the Framework, is currently in development.  Each module includes essential questions, learning outcomes, and active learning resources such as guided reading activities, discussion prompts, and lists of key readings.

The ACRL Framework Toolkit resources are designed to be used in a variety of ways:

  • for their individual professional development needs;
  • to form a community of practice with their colleagues around the Framework and information literacy; and
  • to develop workshops and professional development opportunities in their libraries and also for local, regional, and state-level events and conferences.

Looks like quite a valuable resource!

New Open Resource Designed to Improve Information Literacy Skills

Information Literacy Concepts

Two librarians from East Carolina University have produced a new open-access digital resource targeted to help students successfully complete research assignments. Information Literacy Concepts, an open educational resource  introduces  students to information literacy topics and gives them an overview of how to conduct their own research.

According to the authors,  David Hisle, Learning Technologies Librarian, and Katy Kavanagh Webb, Head of Research and Instructional Services:

 “Students have a greater role and responsibility in creating new knowledge, in understanding the contours and the changing dynamics of the world of information, and in using information, data, and scholarship ethically.

“We want to prepare our students for today’s rapidly changing information landscape. Information literacy skills are essential not just in the work they do as student researchers, but also as college graduates who will need to know how to find and evaluate information to meet their real-world information needs.”

Content includes chapters stemming from navigating search engines, library databases, and discovery tools, to evaluating source credibility and recognizing fake news.

Information Literacy Concepts is available at http://media.lib.ecu.edu/DE/tutorial/OER/Information_Literacy_Concepts.pdf

23 Framework Things

23 Framework ThingsFrom the University of Minnesota,  Duluth 23 Framework Things is a free, self-paced, online professional development opportunity that offers readings, activities, & opportunities to connect with colleagues  about the Framework. Complete as many of the things as you choose, in any order, and win prizes! Here are a few of the “Things” that might be especially helpful:

  • Frame Focus Things: Browse lesson plans & activities on each frame and brainstorm ideas for your own lessons & activities with colleagues
  • Thing #4: Assessment Overview: We all have high hopes about incorporating more assessment into our instruction. This is your year!! In this thing, we ask ourselves, “What would Megan Oakleaf do (with the Framework)?” and explore intentional & achievable ways to assess using the Framework
  • Thing #13: Understanding by Design: Got a few upcoming instruction session/courses? Learn more about the Understanding by Design backward design process and plan your lessons in a way that support student understanding & transfer of knowledge
  • Thing #3: Environmental Scan: Still figuring out how to “frame” the Framework at your institution? Get ideas & inspiration from colleagues and reflect on ways to engage with and embed elements of the Framework into your institution’s curriculum.

So, if you’re looking for ways to engage with the new ACRL IL Framework, check out 23 Framework Things!

Is Authority Always Constructed and Contextual?

The article “Is Authority Always Constructed and Contextual? A Classical Challenge to the Framework for Information Literacy” published in The Christian Librarian (volume 59, issue 2) has just been made available online:  http://digitalcommons.georgefox.edu/tcl/vol59/iss2/6/.

Nathan Rinne, the author, comments:

“[this] article is a little heavier going, as it takes a relentlessly Socratic approach…. (note that my argument is constructed with the intent of being amenable to all kinds of persons, including those of a more secular orientation)

“…. in a blog post I just put up this morning, I also have put up a very rough draft of a proposed frame to replace “Authority is Constructed and Contextual”. Much work needs to be domailto:rinne@csp.edune here, and I invite feedback.”  (rinne@csp.edu)

Students as Library Ambassadors

Chapter 9:  GETTING ON THE INSIDE: Developing a Discipline-Based Student Ambassador Program

Please click on the the link above to read this interesting  open-access chapter from a  newly published ACRL book “Students Lead the Library : the Importance of Student Contributions to the Academic Library” offered by one of the chapter authors who writes:

What I think is unique about our chapter is we talk just as much about what went wrong as we do about what worked well. Feel free to learn from us.

Seminar: Open-Access Publishing @ Benedictine University

Open Access, Predatory Publishing & Constellation

Wednesday, March 15 – 12:00 – 12:45 PM

Library Conference Room – KN 311

Open access journals and institutional repositories benefit the scholarly community, but open access has also opened the door to predatory publishing. Often, predatory journals use convincing titles and list prominent academics on their editorial boards without permission, making it difficult to distinguish them from legitimate journals.

Among the questions addressed by our archivist Katy Scullin and emerging technologies librarian Sarah Kurpiel will be:

  • What is the difference between green and gold open access?
  • What are the benefits?
  • What are the myths?
  • How can I tell if an open access journal is legitimate or predatory?
  • If I publish in a traditional journal, how can I retain some rights to my work?
  • How do I deposit my work in Constellation?
  • What ethical concerns surround for-profit repositories and Sci-Hub?

There will be time at the end of the presentation for discussion.  In addition, Sarah and Katy will be available to help  you to set up a Constellation account.

Questions?  Please contact jhopkins@ben.edu (x6052)

Phony vs Legit

“How Do You Know A Journal or Publisher Is Legitimate?” by Dana Haugh, Stony Hook University LIbraries