“The Information Literacy User’s Guide”

Below is a link to an open source textbook edited this summer by  librarians working from several NYC-based campuses of the College of New Rochelle:

TheInformationLiteracyUsersGuide

Scholarly communications librarian, Lucy Fazzino has this to say about the project:

“We tailored the text for the information literacy needs of the students at The College of New Rochelle in accordance with the Creative Commons License, CC-BY-NC-SA. Having this wonderful open educational resource available allowed us to create a text that was relevant for our student population.”

 

The Value of Academic Libraries

The Value of Academic Libraries Statement   (approved by ACRL  on June 25, 2016) articulates the various ways academic libraries provide direct and indirect value to institutions of higher education by highlighting the essential role that academic libraries play as “one of the few units in a modern institution of higher education that can provide an impact on all realms of institutional importance, from student enrollment to faculty productivity to institutional reputation, while balancing services and resources for all constituency groups and stakeholders in higher education.”

The statement consists of an executive summary, followed by longer talking points that illustrate how academic libraries provide critical direct and indirect value to institutions of higher education in the following areas:

  1. support recruitment, retention and matriculation,
  2. enhance student learning,
  3. support faculty research and teaching, and
  4. raise institutional visibility and contribute to the community.

Customizable posters to help us share this message with our students are available here: VAL-poster-template

 

 

Information Literacy and Art Education

Adapting the Framework for Information Literacy to Studio Art Classes

Trust Los Angeles artist Pae White in her studio

This article reports on a NIU collaboration in an advanced studio art class in photography between a member of the art faculty and the librarian art subject specialist. The collaboration focused on teaching students the role of research in art production, where the Framework’s information literacy concepts served as useful and generative metaphors for different elements of the creative process.

View PowerPoint presentation

Science Students Learn to Use Social Media to Communicate Research

Looking  for an example for the Information Literacy frames Authority is Constructed and Contextual, Scholarship as Conversation, as well as Information has Value?

A July  18, 2016 article in the Chronicle of Higher Education (Science Students Learn to Use Social Media to Communicate Research ) relates how students at Caltech are using social media to promote their research.

Please note: Through the Benedictine Library Constellation Digital Repository, we are also able to collect, store, preserve and provide open access to scholarly content created by Benedictine University students, faculty and staff in all disciplines.  Please contact me for more information.

Here is some further information on this project from one of the Caltech librarians: Continue reading

Exploring Online Student Engagement: Encouraging Active Learning at a Distance

This session, recorded  May 4th, 2016 includes three presentations. Christina Pryor & Kyla Hunt from Amigos Library Services shares practical tips to give warm and humorous presentations, avoid common pitfalls, and increase audience participation. Next, Victoria Raish from Penn State University shares her experience using the social media tool, Yammer, to bring the same robustness of face-to-face debates to the online environment. Finally, Adele Merritt Bernard, Arlene Alleyne-Regis & Selwyn Rodulfo from the University of the West Indies Open Campus shares their experiences creating a positive and active learning experience and engaging library users across a diverse and distributed university population.

The Framework and the Sciences

The Information Literacy committee of ACRL’s Science & Technology Section is has developed a new research guide where  resources ( (i.e., articles, books, book chapters, online guides & sites)  have been applied to the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education  in the sciences (including math, engineering, and technology).

The guide is intended to provide a place for librarians to find resources to guide their information literacy instruction for science students and faculty.

Here is the link to the new guide: http://iue.libguides.com/STS-informationliteracyresources

“The Standards” Recinded

From the ACRL Insider, June 25, 2016:

Today the ACRL Board of Directors voted to rescind the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. The Board will continue to discuss next steps to support all academic librarians working with information literacy at its public meeting on Monday afternoon at the ALA Annual Conference in Orlando.

It is important to acknowledge the groundbreaking work embodied in the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, approved by the Board in 2000, in moving the profession forward. These Standards were co-developed with and subsequently endorsed by the American Association for Higher Education and the Council for Independent Colleges.

ACRL recognizes the tremendous contributions of the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education and the transformational work of many ACRL members working with them. Those Standards paved the way for information literacy to become common language in many general education requirements and informed many regional and subject-oriented accreditation bodies. The Board will continue to seek input from the profession as the process moves forward.

The Positive Contributions of Academic Libraries to Student Learning and Success

Report Cover

A new ACRL report provides compelling evidence for the contributions of academic libraries to student learning and success.  The report focuses on outcomes from projects conducted as part of the Assessment in Action: Academic Libraries and Student Success (AiA) program.   Synthesizing more than 60 individual project reports from the AiA work, the report identifies positive contributions of academic libraries to student learning and success in four key areas:

” 1. Students benefit from library instruction in their initial coursework. Information literacy instruction provided to students during their initial coursework helps them acquire a common set of competencies for their undergraduate studies.

2. Library use increases student success. The analysis of multiple data points (e.g., circulation, library instruction session attendance, online databases access, study room use, interlibrary loan) shows that students who use the library in some way achieve higher levels of academic success (e.g., GPA, course grades, retention) than students who did not use the library.

3. Collaborative academic programs and services involving the library enhance student learning. Library partnerships with other campus units, such as the writing center, academic enrichment, and speech lab, yield positive benefits for students (e.g., higher grades, academic confidence, retention).

4. Information literacy instruction strengthens GenEd outcomes.  Several AiA projects document that libraries improve their institution’s general education outcomes and demonstrate that information literacy contributes to inquiry-based and problem-solving learning, including critical thinking, ethical reasoning, global understanding, and civic engagement.”

Link to the full document.

Threshold Concepts for Professional Students Learning to Be Researchers

New article on threshold concepts for researchers in veterinary medicine:

Kristine Alpi & Chad Hoggan (2016): Recognizing the Value of Threshold Concepts: Application of a Conceptual Tool to Professional Students Learning to Be Researchers, The Reference Librarian, 57(2):114-130. DOI: 10.1080/02763877.2016.1121070

Available via the NC State Scholarly Publications Repository as a post-print : http://repository.lib.ncsu.edu/publications/handle/1840.2/2719

THE REFERENCE LIBRARIAN is available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02763877.2016.1121070