Information Literacy Learning Activities: Race & Social Justice

The Benedictine librarians, in collaboration with faculty, have created some learning activities to help develop the Information Literacy skills of our students.  Here are some resources you may wish to use to support some of the research assignments related to next week’s Teach-In activitiesYou’ll also find them posted in the Race and Social Justice Research Guide:

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is an activity we introduced at one of our Engaging Our Digital Natives workshops last year.  Since then, we’ve been told that many faculty have used this resource with great success.

–  Use the slides to discuss how information is delivered in various formats.   How do you determine which formats are the most reliable?  Which formats are appropriate for academic research?  What is the difference between scholarly and academic resources?   Which are primary and which are secondary resources?

If you have room to move around your classroom space, give each student a different format (tweet, library book, article, etc.) and have them work together to determine the sequence in which these different forms of information were created.
Link to additional discussion questions.

o   access subject specific academic databases
o   export citations to the new version of RefWorks
o   use GoogleScholar to create a “citation chain”
May these prove to be helpful resources for you!

 

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Now Available: The Information Literacy Sandbox

The  ACRL Framework for Information Literacy Sandbox (sandbox.acrl.org) has been launched.  It is designed to serve as a place to discover ways to use the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education in instructional settings, as well as to share activities and teaching resources related to the Framework.

Searching and browsing for resources is open to everyone.  You do not need a contributor account to visit the site and be inspired by the resources that have been shared.

Now,  please go enjoy the Sandbox!

 

Framework for Information Literacy “Sandbox”

ACRL has selected the Cherry Hill Company to develop a  Framework Sandbox. The Sandbox will be an open access database for librarians and other academic partners to share, organize, and archive educational resources related to the use of the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education in practice and professional development.

With the Drupal open source web content management system as a foundation, the Sandbox will feature a flexible search and browse interface where users can search for resources tailored to their needs, contribute content, and participate in dynamic sharing through user comments and opportunities to invite adaptations of submissions. Besides searching for resources created by others, users can use the Sandbox as a repository to collect their own ongoing work at an individual or institutional level. The Sandbox will bring together a wide range of Framework-related instructional resources, including lesson plans, assessments, practitioner reflections, and professional development materials.

I will share more details about the Framework Sandbox as they become available.

Engaging with the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy

Engaging with the ACRL Framework

In this presentation, Trudi Jacobson and Craig Gibson, co-chairs of the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force, identify the ideas underpinning the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy, which creates new opportunities for collaboration on campuses around student engagement with the information ecosystem . The Framework promotes knowledge practices and habits of mind as learning goals, and emphasizes the evolving role of the student as creator as well as consumer of knowledge.   In this presentation the presenters identify principles for instructional design supporting the Framework, as well as assessment methods that address developmental aspects of learning the information literacy concepts and practices comprising the Framework.

“The Information Literacy User’s Guide”

Below is a link to an open source textbook edited this summer by  librarians working from several NYC-based campuses of the College of New Rochelle:

TheInformationLiteracyUsersGuide

Scholarly communications librarian, Lucy Fazzino has this to say about the project:

“We tailored the text for the information literacy needs of the students at The College of New Rochelle in accordance with the Creative Commons License, CC-BY-NC-SA. Having this wonderful open educational resource available allowed us to create a text that was relevant for our student population.”

 

The Value of Academic Libraries

The Value of Academic Libraries Statement   (approved by ACRL  on June 25, 2016) articulates the various ways academic libraries provide direct and indirect value to institutions of higher education by highlighting the essential role that academic libraries play as “one of the few units in a modern institution of higher education that can provide an impact on all realms of institutional importance, from student enrollment to faculty productivity to institutional reputation, while balancing services and resources for all constituency groups and stakeholders in higher education.”

The statement consists of an executive summary, followed by longer talking points that illustrate how academic libraries provide critical direct and indirect value to institutions of higher education in the following areas:

  1. support recruitment, retention and matriculation,
  2. enhance student learning,
  3. support faculty research and teaching, and
  4. raise institutional visibility and contribute to the community.

Customizable posters to help us share this message with our students are available here: VAL-poster-template

 

 

Information Literacy and Art Education

Adapting the Framework for Information Literacy to Studio Art Classes

Trust Los Angeles artist Pae White in her studio

This article reports on a NIU collaboration in an advanced studio art class in photography between a member of the art faculty and the librarian art subject specialist. The collaboration focused on teaching students the role of research in art production, where the Framework’s information literacy concepts served as useful and generative metaphors for different elements of the creative process.

View PowerPoint presentation

Science Students Learn to Use Social Media to Communicate Research

Looking  for an example for the Information Literacy frames Authority is Constructed and Contextual, Scholarship as Conversation, as well as Information has Value?

A July  18, 2016 article in the Chronicle of Higher Education (Science Students Learn to Use Social Media to Communicate Research ) relates how students at Caltech are using social media to promote their research.

Please note: Through the Benedictine Library Constellation Digital Repository, we are also able to collect, store, preserve and provide open access to scholarly content created by Benedictine University students, faculty and staff in all disciplines.  Please contact me for more information.

Here is some further information on this project from one of the Caltech librarians: Continue reading

Exploring Online Student Engagement: Encouraging Active Learning at a Distance

This session, recorded  May 4th, 2016 includes three presentations. Christina Pryor & Kyla Hunt from Amigos Library Services shares practical tips to give warm and humorous presentations, avoid common pitfalls, and increase audience participation. Next, Victoria Raish from Penn State University shares her experience using the social media tool, Yammer, to bring the same robustness of face-to-face debates to the online environment. Finally, Adele Merritt Bernard, Arlene Alleyne-Regis & Selwyn Rodulfo from the University of the West Indies Open Campus shares their experiences creating a positive and active learning experience and engaging library users across a diverse and distributed university population.