Students as Library Ambassadors

Chapter 9:  GETTING ON THE INSIDE: Developing a Discipline-Based Student Ambassador Program

Please click on the the link above to read this interesting  open-access chapter from a  newly published ACRL book “Students Lead the Library : the Importance of Student Contributions to the Academic Library” offered by one of the chapter authors who writes:

What I think is unique about our chapter is we talk just as much about what went wrong as we do about what worked well. Feel free to learn from us.

Seminar: Open-Access Publishing @ Benedictine University

Open Access, Predatory Publishing & Constellation

Wednesday, March 15 – 12:00 – 12:45 PM

Library Conference Room – KN 311

Open access journals and institutional repositories benefit the scholarly community, but open access has also opened the door to predatory publishing. Often, predatory journals use convincing titles and list prominent academics on their editorial boards without permission, making it difficult to distinguish them from legitimate journals.

Among the questions addressed by our archivist Katy Scullin and emerging technologies librarian Sarah Kurpiel will be:

  • What is the difference between green and gold open access?
  • What are the benefits?
  • What are the myths?
  • How can I tell if an open access journal is legitimate or predatory?
  • If I publish in a traditional journal, how can I retain some rights to my work?
  • How do I deposit my work in Constellation?
  • What ethical concerns surround for-profit repositories and Sci-Hub?

There will be time at the end of the presentation for discussion.  In addition, Sarah and Katy will be available to help  you to set up a Constellation account.

Questions?  Please contact jhopkins@ben.edu (x6052)

Phony vs Legit

“How Do You Know A Journal or Publisher Is Legitimate?” by Dana Haugh, Stony Hook University LIbraries

Information Literacy Learning Activities: Race & Social Justice

The Benedictine librarians, in collaboration with faculty, have created some learning activities to help develop the Information Literacy skills of our students.  Here are some resources you may wish to use to support some of the research assignments related to next week’s Teach-In activitiesYou’ll also find them posted in the Race and Social Justice Research Guide:

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is an activity we introduced at one of our Engaging Our Digital Natives workshops last year.  Since then, we’ve been told that many faculty have used this resource with great success.

–  Use the slides to discuss how information is delivered in various formats.   How do you determine which formats are the most reliable?  Which formats are appropriate for academic research?  What is the difference between scholarly and academic resources?   Which are primary and which are secondary resources?

If you have room to move around your classroom space, give each student a different format (tweet, library book, article, etc.) and have them work together to determine the sequence in which these different forms of information were created.
Link to additional discussion questions.

o   access subject specific academic databases
o   export citations to the new version of RefWorks
o   use GoogleScholar to create a “citation chain”
May these prove to be helpful resources for you!

 

Now Available: The Information Literacy Sandbox

The  ACRL Framework for Information Literacy Sandbox (sandbox.acrl.org) has been launched.  It is designed to serve as a place to discover ways to use the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education in instructional settings, as well as to share activities and teaching resources related to the Framework.

Searching and browsing for resources is open to everyone.  You do not need a contributor account to visit the site and be inspired by the resources that have been shared.

Now,  please go enjoy the Sandbox!

 

Framework for Information Literacy “Sandbox”

ACRL has selected the Cherry Hill Company to develop a  Framework Sandbox. The Sandbox will be an open access database for librarians and other academic partners to share, organize, and archive educational resources related to the use of the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education in practice and professional development.

With the Drupal open source web content management system as a foundation, the Sandbox will feature a flexible search and browse interface where users can search for resources tailored to their needs, contribute content, and participate in dynamic sharing through user comments and opportunities to invite adaptations of submissions. Besides searching for resources created by others, users can use the Sandbox as a repository to collect their own ongoing work at an individual or institutional level. The Sandbox will bring together a wide range of Framework-related instructional resources, including lesson plans, assessments, practitioner reflections, and professional development materials.

I will share more details about the Framework Sandbox as they become available.

Engaging with the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy

Engaging with the ACRL Framework

In this presentation, Trudi Jacobson and Craig Gibson, co-chairs of the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force, identify the ideas underpinning the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy, which creates new opportunities for collaboration on campuses around student engagement with the information ecosystem . The Framework promotes knowledge practices and habits of mind as learning goals, and emphasizes the evolving role of the student as creator as well as consumer of knowledge.   In this presentation the presenters identify principles for instructional design supporting the Framework, as well as assessment methods that address developmental aspects of learning the information literacy concepts and practices comprising the Framework.

“The Information Literacy User’s Guide”

Below is a link to an open source textbook edited this summer by  librarians working from several NYC-based campuses of the College of New Rochelle:

TheInformationLiteracyUsersGuide

Scholarly communications librarian, Lucy Fazzino has this to say about the project:

“We tailored the text for the information literacy needs of the students at The College of New Rochelle in accordance with the Creative Commons License, CC-BY-NC-SA. Having this wonderful open educational resource available allowed us to create a text that was relevant for our student population.”